JBO - Volume 22 - Issue 4 - Beethoven in the Vision Therapy Room

Journal: 
Author: 
Eubank, Tressa, OD
Title: 
Beethoven in the Vision Therapy Room
Abstract: 

This paper provides a brief review of the anatomical and functional correlates of the brain. This review will prepare
the reader for the rationale for including rhythm, timing, and music in the vision therapy room and to incorporate
the multi-sensory model to enhance and accelerate the patient’s outcome.

JBO - Volume 18 - Issue 6 - Optometric Vision Therapy in the Management of Consecutive Intermittent Exotropia with Dissociated Vertical Deviation and Anomalous Correspondence - A Case Study

Journal: 
Author: 
Chorn, B.
Steiner, A.
Title: 
Optometric Vision Therapy in the Management of Consecutive Intermittent Exotropia with Dissociated Vertical Deviation and Anomalous Correspondence - A Case Study
Abstract: 

Consecutive exotropia refers to a manifest exodeviation following surgery to correct esotropia. Surgery is common for early onset esotropia, particularly congenital/infantile esotropia. Congenital/infantile esotropia is usually accompanied by several ocular phenomena, including: latent nystagmus, dissociated vertical deviation (DVD) and overaction of the extraocular muscles, especially the inferior obliques. Additionally, since there is a disturbance in normal binocular vision, anomalous correspondence (AC) is often present. Despite this poor or limited binocularity, interventions to increase fusional ability are possible and should be considered.

JBO - Volume 14 - Issue 6 - Multimodal Treatment of Congenital Nystagmus - A Case Study

Journal: 
Author: 
Ciuffreda, M.A.
McCann, A.L.
Gruning, C.F.
Ciuffreda, K.J.
Title: 
Multimodal Treatment of Congenital Nystagmus - A Case Study
Abstract: 

Congenital nystagmus (CN) is characterized by abnormal, involuntary, rhythmic ocular oscillations that occur independently of and superimposed upon one's normal eye movements. There are many theories related to the pathogenesis and treatment of congenital nystagmus. However, few studies have reported the use of multiple treatment modalities in these patients to reduce their nystagmus and optimize visual performance. This case study outlines the general examination procedures and optometric findings of a male teenager with congenital nystagmus involving such a multimodal treatment strategy. The treatment regimen included maximum refractive correction with compensatory prism and a program of conventional optometric vision therapy, as well as experimental use of soft contact lenses. Improvements included increased visual acuity, reduced nystagmus, markedly improved near point of convergence, increased stereoacuity, much greater control of the exotropia, and improved cosmesis. Objective eye movement recordings were taken at the end of therapy to illustrate the differential effects of the multimodal treatment methods on nystagmus reduction. The results demonstrate the efficacy of such a multi-faceted optometric approach in the clinical treatment of congenital nystagmus.