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The Art & Science of Optometric Care – A Behavioral Perspective

The Art & Science of Optometric Care – A Behavioral Perspective

This course will be over the internet. Length: 5 days. Continuing Education Credits: 35 hours. Prerequisite: None For: Optometrists

Course Description

This course is highly interactive, with small group presentations and hands-on experience that will provide the experience you need for the confidence you desire. Free continuing consultation is offered after courses to ensure you have the resources available to help you through difficult cases and give you the reinforcement you need to continue to develop your analytical and clinical skills. This course helps you understand why you do what you do.

1

Instructor Bio

Dr. Geoff Heddle, OD, FCOVD,FCSO

Geoffrey A. Heddle, OD was born and raised in Uxbridge, ON, Canada. He completed his Bachelor of Science (BSc.) at the U. of Waterloo, and obtained a Bachelor of Science, and Doctorate of Optometry from Indiana University.

Dr. Geoff Heddle, OD, FCOVD,FCSO

Courses Details

Length

5 Days

Continuing Education Credits

35 hours

Prerequisite

None

For

Optometrists

Location

Over the internet

When

Sept. 10th - Sept. 14th, 2021

Course Description

The Art & Science of Optometric Care explains the science and logic of the behavioral approach. This knowledge is the basis for a wider range of prescribing options and an expanded ability to meet patients’ needs. After taking this course, problem patients won’t be such a problem anymore. Participants will emerge with a new respect and understanding of the power of lenses. You will have an increased number of prescribing options that you can count on. Putting this knowledge into practice will lead to an increased rate of prescribing success, improved patient compliance and improved patient retention. Course participants will come away with a broader understanding of the development of various refractive conditions, how to prevent negative changes, and being able to guide the patient toward more effective and efficient functioning.

 

Prescribing patterns are usually altered significantly so that the participant knows how to use lenses in a more powerful way. When can you or should you prescribe something other than what you measure? How far can you deviate from your measurements in either the amount of sphere, cylinder power, cylinder axis or amount of aniso? Why would a person have trouble adjusting to a prescription through which he sees optimally well? What lenses optimize visual performance? Why should you prescribe prisms with the bases in the same direction (yoked prisms)?

 

This course provides the participants with answers to the question “Why?” while providing the scientific and neurological basis for understanding human behavior. Participants will emerge with an understanding of the process and underlying physiological changes as patients build refractive and other visual conditions.

Course Highlights

A comprehensive study of behavioral optometry and the benefits it offers over general optometry. The behavioral vision exam – one participant will be examined to demonstrate the ease with which the analytical gives insight into the patient’s visual needs. “Milking” the analytical – a step-by-step discussion of each diagnostic test, how to do it, why to do it, how to record it, and what it tells us about the patient. Stress Point Retinoscopy – a critically important tool will be demonstrated and taught. The relationship between posture & vision, from which a comprehensive understanding of the development of astigmatism, and the use of yoked prisms will emerge. The alternatives of care and how to present them includes an in depth look at compensatory lenses, lens treatment, and vision therapy. Key practice management techniques to get you rolling right away. Building a successful behavioral optometric practice through communication – reports, updates, in-office seminars, external speaking engagements. Putting the knowledge gained from the Art & Science Course to work can be the basis for a more confident, efficient practice of optometry that is ultimately more satisfying for both doctor and patient. You will be equipped to practice the full scope of your profession.

Course Location

Online Course

Cancellation policy

We are not offering any cancellation fee at this time only voucher towards future courses with a valid cancellation reason.

Bio

Dr. Geoff Heddle, OD, FCOVD,FCSO

Geoffrey A. Heddle, OD was born and raised in Uxbridge, ON, Canada. He completed his Bachelor of Science (BSc.) at the U. of Waterloo, and obtained a Bachelor of Science, and Doctorate of Optometry from Indiana University.

Geoff has practiced in various parts of the country, and currently resides in SW Michigan with his wife and their children.

Dr. Heddle has spent time as an adjunct faculty member of Indiana University’s school of Optometry. He has also been involved in InfantSee, and HeadStart.

Dr. Heddle’s history of sports participation and passion for Behavioural Optometry provides him a unique insight to the field of Sports Vision. He has lectured extensively, around the world, on the topic.

He is a clinical associate of OEPF, and a member of COVD, NORA and CSO. He currently is on the CSO board and is a Fellow of the College of Syntonic Optometry

Course Schedule

Course will run 10am to 6pm daily and will end at 5pm on last day

 

For additional detail please call:

410 561 3791

Or email:

sherice.gainey@oepf.org

line.vreven@oepf.org

For additional educational opportunities please
contact:

line.vreven@oepf.org

Pre-Course Readings (All Attendees)

The Evolution of a Model and A Model of Vision  (Read The Evolution of a Model first.) are included to introduce you to our approach to teaching.  These two papers describe the process for much of what comes in the courses and we hope you understand that we instructors evolve in our thinking much like we hope you will.  We hope to take you on a compressed journey through the evolution of our thinking.  We will begin an area by showing you where we were at one time in our development.  Then we present the unanswered questions that became the foundation for looking at things in a different way. We will then present our understandings now and include new information for where we might go in the future.

The Evolution of a Model was presented at the Skeffington Symposium in Washington DC in the early 1980’s.  This paper charts the development of Paul Harris’ model of vision from what he assimilated from his years at SUNY (1975-79) until the time of the writing of the paper.  Much of the change came as a result of a presentation by Dr. Robert A. Kraskin and involvement in the Washington DC based OEPF study group, the Institute for Behavioral Optometry.  A Model of Vision was initially presented at the Skeffington Symposium in Washington DC and then adapted for the JOVD.

The following articles have been put in the recommended order to be read:

  1. Harris, Paul, “The Evolution of a Model”, Skeffington Symposium
    • This paper was presented at the Skeffington Symposium in Washington DC in the early 1980’s.  This paper charts the development of Paul Harris’ model of vision from what he assimilated from his years at SUNY (1975-79) until the time of the writing of the paper.  Much of the change came as a result of a presentation by Dr. Robert A. Kraskin and involvement in the Washington DC based OEPF study group, the Institute for Behavioral Optometry.
  2. Harris, Paul, “Perspectives on Behavioral Optometry — A Model of Vision”, JOVD
    • This paper was initially presented at the Skeffington Symposium in Washington DC and then adapted for the JOVD.
  3. Harris, Paul, “Visual Conditions of Symphony Musicians”, JAOA, Volume 59, Number 12, 12/88
    • This paper describes the development of astigmatism based on the relationship between posture and vision.  The most important concept in this paper is the relationship between visual conditions and what the person does in life.
  4. Harris, Paul, “Additional Topics to Original, Visual Conditions of Symphony Musicians”
    • When the above article was written it included additional information that was edited out during the pre-publication period.  This pre-reading contains this additional material in order to help make the concepts more complete.
  5. Harris, Paul, “The Prevalence of Visual Conditions in a Population of Juvenile Delinquents”, OEPF, Curriculum II, Volume 61, Number 4, January 1989
    • This paper, while dated, is included here because the article includes fundamental discussions of the examination process including specific descriptions of the testing sequence, lighting conditions, targets, and instructional sets.  The appendix of this paper was first written as a step-by-step “How-to” guide for the Optometric Center of Maryland.   The paper introduces the concepts of the “Visual Virgin” and embeddedness, as well as other new topics covered in the Art and Science course.
  6. Williams, GJ, Kitchener G, Press LJ, Steele GT, Vision: A Collaboration of Eyes and Brain
    • This paper was created jointly by the authors and was adopted by the American Optometric Association as a position paper. It is a well-documented and succinct in showing that their vision is much more than just sight and gives insight into the degree that the eyes and brain are in full partnership in helping the visual process emerge.

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Take This Course

This course is only available for OD’s

Standard

$2500

CA

$2250

Post Grad (1 year)

$1125

Audit**

$1125

Faculty

$1125

Resident

$495

**Retaking a course (A&S, VT1,VT2,VT3) previously attended. Must be able to provide proof of completion if asked.